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Working Group 3: Change LeadersWorking Groups 2 & 4: Costs, Benefits, and Demonstrating ImpactWorking Group 6: Aligning Faculty Work

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Results 1 - 10 of 252 matches

Change theory and theory of change: what's the difference anyway?
Daniel L. Reinholz; and Tessa C. Andrews
This essay describes the connections between a theory of change and change theory and provides examples of how change theory can inform a project's theory of change.

Change Topics (Working Groups): Guiding Theories
Resource Type: Journal Article
Program Components: Institutional Systems:Strategic Planning

'Eat Your Veggies' Research: Why I pursue qualitative research for an audience of quantitative-minded engineering educators
Stephen Secules, Florida International University
In conversations on equity and education, I often hear people claim a certain relationship between qualitative and quantitative research— qualitative research can explore new complex topics in depth, so that subsequent quantitative research can demonstrate the trend. Further, if you want to convince an engineering or STEM educator of something, that quantitative trend will be crucial. Since the educator audience values numbers, the qualitative descriptions or arguments will be perceived as anecdotal.

Resource Type: Blog Post
Program Components: Professional Development:Cultural Competency, Diversity/Inclusion, Pedagogical Training

Competency-based education: A study of four new models and their implications for bending the higher education cost curve
Donna M. Desrochers; Richard L. Staisloff
In this report the authors assess CBE programs at four institutions by considering business models, costs, etc. and what is required from institutions to 'get to breakeven'. The four institutions anticipate breaking even with their programs by the fifth year, and they project that by the sixth year these programs will be operating at half the cost of the traditional academic programs. The article describes how an evaluation of the competency- based education business model must include considerations regarding price, efficiency (academic delivery structure, staff ratios, and compensation), and scale (student recruitment, enrollment, and retention).

Change Topics (Working Groups): Costs and Benefits
Resource Type: Report
Program Components: Professional Development:Curriculum Development, Institutional Systems:Strategic Planning, Professional Development:Course Evaluation

Whether and How Money Matters in K-12 Education
Margaret L. Plecki; Tino A. Castańeda
The authors review the research on the allocation of resources to support improvement of student learning in public K-12 education, including policies, methodological issues, and availability of data.

Change Topics (Working Groups): Costs and Benefits
Resource Type: Journal Article
Program Components: Outreach:Outreach to K12 Teachers and Students, Institutional Systems:Strategic Planning

Active learning narrows achievement gaps for underrepresented students in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and math
Elli J. Theobald; Mariah J. Hill; Elisa Tran; Sweta Agrawal; E. Nicole Arroyo; Shawn Behling; Nyasha Chambwe; Dianne Laboy Cintrón; Jacob D. Cooper; Gideon Dunster; Jared A. Grummer; Kelly Hennessey; Jennifer Hsiao; Nicole Iranon; Leonard Jones II; Hannah Jordt; Marlowe Keller; Melissa E. Lacey; Caitlin E. Littlefield; Alexander Lowe; Shannon Newman; Vera Okolo; Savannah Olroyd; Brandon R. Peecook; Sarah B. Pickett; David L. Slager; Itzue W. Caviedes-Solis; Kathryn E. Stanchak; Vasudha Sundaravardan; Camila Valdebenito; Claire R. Williams; Kaitlin Zinsli; and Scott Freeman
This study is a comprehensive meta-analysis of research on the influence of active and traditional learning approaches on STEM course outcomes (exam scores and course failure rates) for underrepresented students. Time-intensive active learning experiences contributed to reduced achievement gaps in exam scores and pass rates. Researchers concluded that deliberate active-learning course designs and inclusive teaching contribute to increasing equity in STEM. Although this study does not discuss cost-benefits, it affirms the value of investing in pedagogical enhancements to increase student retention and success. In this case, the benefits are continuous tuition revenue through student retention and the moral imperative of reducing equity gaps.

Change Topics (Working Groups): Costs and Benefits
Resource Type: Journal Article
Program Components: Supporting Students:Student Engagement, Professional Development:Curriculum Development, Institutional Systems:Strategic Planning, Professional Development:Diversity/Inclusion

How UT-Austin's Bold Plan for Reinvention Went Belly Up
Lindsay Ellis
This article provides a cautionary tale about large institutional efforts to redesign undergraduate education and the challenges of measuring what works. In 2016, UT Austin pledged to revamp undergraduate education, adding state-of-the-art online classes, redesigned curricula, and short courses, among others, to produce less expensive degrees, teach practical skills and expand access via technology. Dubbed "Project 2021" it also committed to measure what worked and adjust accordingly. By 2019, the project was deemed too ambitious and lacked support to continue. Several lessons about the impact of changes in undergraduate teaching are useful. For example, implementing regular quizzes in large classes narrowed grade disparities between students from different socioeconomic groups. Massive online classes modeled after late-nighttalk shows were hailed as a national model for using technology to deliver remote instruction and billed as next-generation undergraduate programs. Yet, while students rated the online courses highly, evaluations of student learning showed no advantage to the course delivering mode, and the cost for the heavily produced studio quality courses was high. Key conclusions from the project evaluation is that it was very complicated and lacked direction, got caught in bureaucratic processes, and was expensive.

Change Topics (Working Groups): Costs and Benefits
Resource Type: Report, Website
Program Components: Institutional Systems:Strategic Planning

Valuing Assessment: Cost-Benefit Considerations
Randy L. Swing; Christopher S. Coogan

Change Topics (Working Groups): Costs and Benefits
Resource Type: Report
Program Components: Institutional Systems:Strategic Planning

Improving Learning and Reducing Costs: Fifteen Years of Course Redesign
Carol A. Twigg

Change Topics (Working Groups): Costs and Benefits
Resource Type: Journal Article
Program Components: Professional Development:Curriculum Development, Institutional Systems:Strategic Planning

Investing in Success: Cost-Effective Strategies to Increase Student Success
Jane Wellman; and Rima Brusi

Change Topics (Working Groups): Costs and Benefits
Resource Type: Report
Program Components: Institutional Systems:Strategic Planning

What Is the Potential for Applying Cost-Utility Analysis to Facilitate Evidence-Based Decision Making in Schools?
Fiona Hollands; Yilin Pan; Maya Escueta
The authors investigated the feasibility of applying a decision-making framework based on cost-utility analysis to facilitate decision-making. A key challenge was guiding decision makers to find suitable evidence.

Change Topics (Working Groups): Costs and Benefits
Resource Type: Journal Article
Program Components: Institutional Systems:Strategic Planning